Scottish Mining Villages

Housing

Glencraig

This is also [a village] of recent growth, but there are no washhouses or water-closets to the houses belonging to the Wilsons and Clyde Coal Company, Limited. There are ash-pits and dry-privies erected on the ground used for drying clothes. The same objection applies to these as in the other cases. The roads and footpaths in wet weather are bad. [Evidence presented to Royal Commission, 13th October 1913 by Michael Lee]

Lochore
This also is, for the most part, of recent growth, but there are about 140 old houses with no drainage. They have dry-closets and ash-pits. Some of the houses have no coal cellars – at Milton and Flockhouse. Complaints in regard to neglect of repairs is general. Owing to the scarcity of houses, there are complaints of overcrowding, a family often occupying a room each in a two-roomed house. The roads and lighting are far from satisfactory. Some of the houses are below the level of the road. [Evidence presented to Royal Commission, 13th October 1913 by Michael Lee]

Lumphinnans
There is no water-closet accommodation to nearly 50 per cent, of the houses, there being only ashpits and dry closets.*

The distance between the houses in Sligo Street and Mungall Street, owned by the Fife Coal Company, Limited, is only about 20 yards. In the open space, between which is the only ground available for drying clothes, there are a number of open ashpits and dry-closets, a most obnoxious arrangement, and one which should be rectified at once.

The roads and streets are in a bad condition, especially during wet weather, Main Street being a quagmire in places in winter.

There is no lighting except in the Main Street, unless a few isolated lamps.

[* In a subsequent communication witness writes- “I find I made a mistake; the houses on north side of road, one half have water closets, the other half have one water-closet for three houses and they are in a very unsatisfactory condition”][Evidence presented to Royal Commission, 13th October 1913 by Michael Lee]

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